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Produce More Eggs

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Why Do Hens Stop Laying Eggs

Understanding Natural Egg Laying Cycles

Unless you raise your chickens indoors in a climate controlled area (like a factory) that will include the proper and consistent amounts of light, fresh air and heat in the winter, your chickens are "natural chickens" A naturally raised chicken in your backyard has Mother Nature's egg cycle. Not the egg cycle of a forced factory egg laying chicken. Most hatchery stock or farm breeds have a natural egg laying cycle that is controlled by the amount of light they receive and the weather that they are exposed to on a daily basis. Of course the diet that your chickens have will also have a big impact on the egg cycle of the hens. A poor diet will result in fewer eggs. Remember, what you feed your hens will also become your food! So feed your chickens well for the best and healthiest eggs.

 

So in winter, with about eight hours a day for light, most hens do not have enough light to produce eggs on a regular schedule.  And in the summer heat, most hens bodies need a break from the busy spring egg laying season. Its important to understand that your chickens can stop laying eggs in very cloudy weather, wet and rainy days, extreme cold or heat or stress will also be a factor in the reducing of the amount of eggs you can collect daily. Although we collect many eggs year round from our flocks, don't "eggspect" that your chickens can lay every day. Most breeds on average will lay about five eggs a week. this varies according to breed and weather conditions.

 

Therefore, "natural" chickens outdoors in your backyard coop will lay best in crisp spring or fall weather. Most chickens DO lay in other seasons, just not as regular nor productive. Some breeds of chickens will lay more often than other breeds. So what determines when they lay eggs is your hens diet, genetics, and their environment too. But the fresh eggs you get from your own backyard flock will taste better than the store bought eggs... guaranteed!  

BONUS TIP! for a quick boost to non laying hens, if you have tried other ways to encourage your hens to lay eggs: Add hot peppers to the diet (cayenne, jalapeno, serrano or other chilies or peppers NOT ghost or extremely hot!) to their water or just let them eat a few hot peppers. this will stimulate them to start laying eggs..

Helpful Tips On Why Your Chickens May Stop Laying Eggs

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Blue Star Uses Probiotics For Balanced Bacteria In Coop -
Click To See Video

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Change the bedding in nest boxes each week for the happiest hens and cleanest eggs- A good choice for your nest box is hay or straw. Pine shavings may allow eggs to roll to the bottom of the nest.

Tips For Your Best Egg Production
 
change nest bedding each week
 
keep chickens from stress
 
in winter add heat lamps
 
feed a high protein diet of 20% or more
 
add fresh fruits and vegetables to diet
 
de-worm chickens each season
 
keep coop balanced with correct bacteria to avoid diseases

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